The Right to a Speedy Trial in Canada






















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The Supreme Court of Canada




breathed life into this constitutional guarantee in 1990 with the

decision, ruling that a two-year delay in bringing four suspects to trial for


extortion and tour cửu trại câu giá rẻ firearms offences was a violation of their right to be tried


within a reasonable time pursuant to Section 11(b). This led to a stay of


proceedings against Askov and his co-accused, along with thousands of other


accused persons throughout Ontario.


It also set the stage for thousands of so called “Askov applications” across Canada in the


subsequent years.







 







In 1992, the Supreme Court of


Canada raised the bar for tour cửu trại câu từ hà nội future Askov applications with the .


Although the length and cause of the delay remains a significant factor, the


Supreme Court made clear in Morin that other factors must also be considered,


and placed a certain onus on the accused to demonstrate that the delay


prejudiced their defense or adversely affected them in some way.